Doodle Blogging

Upkeeping a blog can be stressful (I say on the blog that gets the least of my attention). Heck, writing is stressful, even if you love it. Even if you love the subject matter. Being aware of the craft of writing means that you are second-guessing your word choices, that the smallest typo will haunt your waking moments, that sleep will elude you for the sake of lethologica –

lethologica
(noun)
the inability to remember a word or put your finger on the right word

– and desks will be flipped for the sake of research roadblocks. If you’re a freelancer, this goes double. Views, comments, likes, and reblogs become measures of success which can determine if you’re able to snag a contributor position on a site or gather Patreon supporters (shameless plug). Exposure becomes your lifeblood and suddenly timing and topical seasons are everything in order to get your pieces circulating. A source of joy becomes a source of stress.

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Mowgli’s Heroism: A Rebuttal to MAN(Cub) OF STEEL

The Jungle Book’s climax was certainly one of mass destruction. One that Andrew Todd of Birth.Movies.Death. found to be frustratingly similar to Man of Steel’s.

[I]t’s incredible to me, so soon after that film’s release, that more people apparently haven’t made the connection between Man of Steel’s D—head Superman and The Jungle Book’s D—head Mowgli. – THE JUNGLE BOOK Has A MAN(Cub) OF STEEL Problem

I respectfully disagree that there is a connection to make.

Spoilers Ahead

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A Close Read of the Elephant Scene (The Jungle Book 2016)

As a whole, The Jungle Book is a wonderfully structured film. Cause and effect build organically against each other, with the environment and character motivations weaving together in an elaborate dance. So it is a bold statement to say that the second meeting with the elephants – the Pit Scene as I will call it – is the best-developed scene in the entire movie. And that’s a statement I’m going to stand by.

By best-developed, I mean that this scene has so many threads that interconnect with this one event to create a very pivotal moment. This scene could not exist as such an impressive feat of storytelling were it a part of a lesser movie.

Spoilers Ahead

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The Hero of Alpha Halo, The Woman Called McKay – Gaming’s Place in Literature

Gaming’s Place in Literature seeks to examine game-related fiction through different lenses of literary analysis.



Master Chief is not the protagonist of Halo: The Flood. He’s certainly the protagonist of Combat Evolved, but in the novelization of the game, he hands the driver’s seat over to one Lieutenant Melissa McKay.

The base definition of a protagonist is simple: “the leading character’ of a story [X]. However with a cast of thousands, and multiple viewpoint characters, it can be difficult to pinpoint who the protagonist actually is. Quickbeam, a content writer over at TheOneRing.net, gives us another method of locating the main character in a story: the narrative.

“[A] character-driven story like LOTR is not strictly about sacrifice (or heroism, or the impermanence of beauty, or all those themes that are intrinsic). I must admit the novel is woven of many threads but the groundwork of the tale, the telling of it, spins on a single proviso: Who is transformed the most between the opening and the closing page, taking the reader through his transformation?” [X]

The telling of the tale, as Quickbeam so graciously highlighted, is also called the narrative. This is the way a story is told, the grand combination of themes, characters, plot, and writing style. Now not all narratives work off the same proviso or condition as Lord of the Rings does. While we do see character transformation in our protagonists throughout the Halo series, Halo 2 being an easy example, one of the groundwork pieces for Halo as a whole is sacrifice.

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